POSSE homework: how to contribute to FOSS without coding

by Sebastian Benthall

One of the assignments for the POSSE workshop is the question of how to contribute to FOSS when you aren’t a coder.

I find this an especially interesting topic because I think there’s a broader political significance to FOSS, but those that see FOSS as merely the domain of esoteric engineers can sometimes be a little freaked out by this idea. It also involves broader theoretical questions about whether or how open source jives with participatory design.

In fact, they have compiled a list of lists of ways to contribute to FOSS without coding: this, this, this, and this are provided in the POSSE syllabus.

Turning our attention from the question in the abstract, we’re meant to think about it in the context of our particular practices.

For our humanitarian FOSS project of choice, how are we interested in contributing? I’m fairly focused in my interests on open source participation these days: I’m very interested in the problem of community metrics and especially how innovation happens and diffuses within these communities. I would like to be able to build a system for evaluating that kind of thing that can be applied broadly to many projects. Ideally, it could do things like identify talented participants across multiple projects, or suggest interventions for making projects work better.

It’s an ambitious research project, but one for which there is plenty of data to investigate from the open source communities themselves.

What about teaching a course on such a thing? I anticipate that my students are likely to be interested in design as well as positioning their own projects within the larger open source ecosystem. Some of the people who I hope will take the class have been working on FuturePress, an open source e-book reading platform. As they grow the project and build the organization around it, they will want to be working with constituent technologies and devising a business model around their work. How can a course on Open Collaboration and Peer Production support that?

These concerns touch on so many issues outside of the consideration of software engineering narrowly (including industrial organization, communication, social network theory…) that it’s daunting to try to fit it all into one syllabus. But we’ve been working on one that has a significant hands-on component as well. Really I think the most valuable skill in the FOSS world is having the chutzpah to approach a digital community, propose what you are thinking, and take the criticism or responsibility that comes with that.

What concrete contribution a student uses to channel that energy should…well, I feel like it should be up to them. But is that enough direction? Maybe I’m not thinking concretely enough for this assignment myself.

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