frustrations with machine ethics

by Sebastian Benthall

It’s perhaps because of the contemporary two cultures problem of tech and the humanities that machine ethics is in such a frustrating state.

Today I read danah boyd’s piece in The Message about technology as an arbiter of fairness. It’s more baffling conflation of data science with neoliberalism. This time, the assertion was that the ideology of the tech industry is neoliberalism hence their idea of ‘fairness’ is individualist and against social fabric. It’s not clear what backs up these kinds of assertions. They are more or less refuted by the fact that industrial data science is obsessed with our network of ties for marketing reasons. If anybody understands the failure of the myth of the atomistic individual, it’s “tech folks,” a category boyd uses to capture, I guess, everyone from marketing people at Google to venture capitalists to startup engineers to IBM researchers. You know, the homogenous category that is “tech folks.”

This kind of criticism makes the mistake of thinking that a historic past is the right way to understand a rapidly changing present that is often more technically sophisticated than the critics understand. But critical academics have fallen into the trap of critiquing neoliberalism over and over again. One problem is that tech folks don’t spend a ton of time articulating their ideology in ways that are convenient for pop culture critique. Often their business models require rather sophisticated understandings of the market, etc. that don’t fit readily into that kind of mold.

What’s needed is substantive progress in computational ethics. Ok, so algorithms are ethically and politically important. What politics would you like to see enacted, and how do you go about implementing that? How do you do it in a way that attracts new users and is competitively funded so that it can keep up with the changing technology with which we use to access the web? These are the real questions. There is so little effort spent trying to answer them. Instead there’s just an endless series of op-ed bemoaning the way things continue to be bad because it’s easier than having agency about making things better.

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